How To Stay Positive When You Hate Your Job

Posted on September 16, 2014 by

stay-positive

Hating your job is not overly unusual. In fact, it’s quite common.

The question is how you deal with it and make the best of what you’ve got.

Perhaps it’s your boss or your colleagues, or maybe the job itself. Whatever the reason, there is always a way to rise above it and stay positive, no matter how much you might feel you hate your job.

A nasty boss is enough to turn anyone away from a position. They could be undermining, disrespectful or just downright rude. At any rate, nobody should have to put up with that kind of treatment, but challenging them on it will only escalate issues further and make work life even more uncomfortable.

The trick is to let it roll off your back and be mentally armed with the necessary internal ammunition so as for it not to scar or wound you. Remind yourself that it’s less about you and more about them.

Consequently, you’ll come across as brave and strong as opposed to defensive and sensitive.

Likewise, if you have similar problems with rude, disrespectful colleagues, rather than make an outwardly, snowball-building scene, learn to laugh at any put downs or snide remarks as it will give you the immediate upper hand and re-shape you in their image.

Perhaps you hate the job itself. Is it boring? Repetitive? Stressful? Predictable? How can you put your own personal touch into things? How can you make it your own? Adding your flavour can not only be personally satisfying, it can also enhance the work and score you brownie points. It’s definitely worth a shot to see how you can make improvements and relieve some of the monotony at the same time.

There are many other potential reasons which might contribute to hating your work environment. Perhaps the geography of the place, or the decor. However, there are just some things we cannot change or if we try to, we will end up making matters worse and probably need to leave.

Staying positive even when you hate your job is the key to surviving in such an environment, and learning to react in ways that dampen, not fuel, the potential fires will mean the difference between a short lived career and a long one.

How To Beat Interview Nerves

Posted on September 3, 2014 by

nervous-about-investigation-interview

Laying claim to the best resume on earth will end up meaning very little if you’re a bag of nerves during your interview.

We all get nervous – and it’s particularly natural in a job interview. However, letting your nerves interfere and take the whole show over is something that can and should be avoided.

Much of the key to quashing those nerves is in the lead up to the interview. For example, if you do your research and know the background to the organisation and have a good handle on the position description, then you won’t be so afraid of questions you’re unprepared for. You’re less likely to hit stumbling blocks or feel inadequate – all of which would ordinarily be recipes for disaster.

Ensure you freshen up and fuel up prior to the big moment. A nutritious, balanced meal that is not too heavy (avoid pasta, for example) will go a long way in keeping your mental functioning at peak and your energy levels stable. Avoid too much coffee as it may over stimulate you and can lead to anxiety. Freshening up with a relaxing bath or hot shower can steady your mind and your nerves.

Try to clear your mind and calm your nerves with some relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation and mindfulness exercises – all of which train the breath to slow, focus and regroup, having an overall calming effect and keeping you in the present moment as opposed to running off with those nerves.

Know your worth. Keep in mind that you’ve made it as far as an interview for a reason. You obviously have skills or prior experience that appeal to the organisation so they are already interested in you and who knows? You might be the favourite applicant. Remember it’s not only a question of whether they want you, but also whether you want them. So always know your worth and strengths – and sell yourself accordingly.

Regardless of how you feel the interview went, it’s always a good idea to ask for feedback which can assist you for future applications.

How to impress your interviewer

Posted on August 18, 2014 by

 

impress_interviewer_adzuna_australia

So, you’ve passed the resume test and beaten countless others to the interview post! Very nice work, but while you might look great on paper, the real test begins in the flesh with the interview.

By now we all know that eye contact and a firm handshake are imperative formalities when trying to impress your interviewer. Yet what are the keys to truly standing out above the rest and making not only a good impression, but a lasting one?

Firstly, lighten up. Regardless of what comes out of your mouth, you need to demonstrate that you can smile and that you have a personality. By the same token, you’re not auditioning for the circus so keep yourself in check, but show your interviewer you’re not made of wood either. The trick is to be likeable, creating an overall impression of someone who would be good to work with. Hopefully that’s you.

Keep your hands still. Lots of gesturing and movement are actually signs of nervousness, discomfort and uncertainty. Being able to articulate your responses without fidgeting about all over the place will showcase you as calm, comfortable and sure of yourself. It’s all about composure.

Sell yourself – but not too much. It sure is an artform knowing when enough is enough. Of course you are there to sell yourself, that’s the whole point (although some forget to sell themselves entirely) and it’s crucial that you believe in your product and know your strengths and weaknesses. Examples of achievements are good to have on hand also. Just don’t go overboard. A couple of examples will do, unless prompted for more, and if you’re letting your answers go on for minutes, then reel yourself in and keep things succinct and relevant. Nobody likes an egomania.

Lastly, offer something for free. Perhaps you could offer to assist with part of a project, submit a sample of some kind, suggest a demonstration document. It’ll form part of your very enthusiastic application and make you surely stand out from the rest… as long as you follow through with the goods of course.

Adzuna Australia is hiring!

Posted on August 6, 2014 by

adzuna_logo

Join Australia’s most exciting recruitment start-up and change the way Australians find their next job!

Adzuna.com.au is a young, hungry start-up on an exciting growth journey to disrupt the online recruitment sector (backed by Fairfax in Australia). Launched in the UK in 2011 we are now live in 11 countries around the world!  Adzuna is now Fairfax Media’s primary digital job listing offering and has deep integration links across the Fairfax sites driving awareness and traffic.

We are already growing the business by over 100% each month and our ambitions are to become the premier destination for Australian job-seekers.  Adzuna.com.au is a search engine for job ads which makes it easier for you to find the right job. We search thousands of websites so you don’t have to and bring together millions of ads so you can find them all in one place. We add powerful search, insightful market data and social connections, so

you can find your perfect ad with a little help from your friends.

Sales Executive

Based at our office in The Rocks, we have an exciting opportunity for a Sales Executive who will be responsible for winning new business and building profitable relationships with large and mid-tier recruitment agencies by selling cost-per-click (CPC) services to support Adzuna’s rapid growth.

Key responsibilities include;

  • Researching the recruitment agency market and generating a list of leads
  • Reaching out and acquiring new business across Australia
  • Responsible for selling, promoting and demonstrating the value of Adzuna’s services to the recruitment industry
  • Manage the entire sales process from prospecting to close, including setting up the campaign and account management
  • Record all sales activity in the CRM and meet all monthly targets and KPI’s
  • Grow share of wallet with customers over time, both budgets and pricing
  • Month end analysis and reporting back to client and management
  • Selling via face-face and over the phone

We are seeking a person who has a minimum of 2 years proven sales and account development experience in online cost-per-click advertising or the recruitment agency or technology/digital agency arena.

The ideal candidate will have a good understanding of the online jobs/classifieds market and recruitment agencies and will be experienced in handling client’s accounts over the phone and face to face along with excellent communication skills and presentation.

We offer a fun, entrepreneurial working environment within an exciting high-growth start up. If you enjoy making a difference and working directly with the business heads, if you are focused and aspire to grow your career – apply now!

Get in touch at careers@adzuna.com.au

Check out our new Adzuna video

Questions to ask in your performance review

Posted on August 5, 2014 by

dv1922023

Source: gettyimages

An essential element to consider when faced with your performance review is that it’s a two-way street.

In other words, it’s not only a review of your performance, but an opportunity for you to discuss matters about the very workplace which impacts your performance.

So, rather than asking “how did I do?” on all fronts, here are five questions you should consider in the interests of a more balanced review.

1. What do you think went well overall this year?

This is a good opportunity to focus on the workplace as a whole. It opens up the conversation to include colleagues, company-wide projects and overall success or lack thereof.

2. Do you think the team work well together?

Asking about the team rather than you as an individual puts the question into the appropriate context. You can, of course, be discussed as part of that team, but it avoids the notion of you versus them.

3. Have any areas of improvement or change in the workplace been identified?

This provides the opportunity to not only gain insight into forecast changes, but to express areas of concern you yourself have of the company, and any ideas you might like to put forward.

4. Is there anything that could have been done differently?

There’s no escaping that some of the review will focus directly on to you and where you may have gone awry. Asking what could have been done differently is preferable to ‘where did I go wrong?’ It shows you’re solution focussed, willing to take criticism and adapt where necessary- so ensure you remain open to responses.

5. What are your most important goals for the coming year?

This question reminds your employer you are on board with the company, there to work for them and ready and willing to embark on the next chapter. It’s also a chance to put forward your own thoughts on future endeavours.

These five questions should put you on course to further questions which retain the two-way approach and land you with a performance review as beneficial for your employer as it is for you.

 

Resume Writing Tips

Posted on July 22, 2014 by
typewriter-resume
By Ross Larkin

Certain aspects of writing a good resume are debatable, like maximum number of pages, style or design.

These three keys to a steadfast resume, however, are essentially non-negotiable.

  1. Catching your reader’s eye
  2. Communicating quickly
  3. Selling yourself

The first two points are actually tools to enable the third. In fact, any element from design to length are all working towards the selling of oneself.

This may sound obvious, yet many job seekers forget they are selling something.

How do you catch your reader’s eye?

The key is not to go overboard. Don’t choose a fancy, hard to read font. Go with a conservative standard like Arial and ensure the size isn’t too small or large.

Your spacing must also be appropriate so your resume isn’t cluttered and difficult to read.

You should have clear sections such as education and employment, so be sure to make your headings slightly larger and well spaced.

Employers are generally busy people with hundreds of applicants to peruse. Hence, you need to communicate a lot in a little amount of time.

Bullet points can be useful but be wary of writing long lists which are irrelevant or unimpressive. Choose the best and ditch the rest.

Highlight your specific skills so they stand out. Many companies nowadays use digital databases to search for keywords, so sometimes it’s also a case of catching the computer’s eye.

Common buzzwords include “strategic” or “proactive”, but it depends on the industry you’re in, so do your research first.

Now, what are you selling?

Don’t just state your skills, state the benefit of them.

For example, “Strong interpersonal skills, helpful when dealing with sensitive topics”.

Aim for achievements over responsibilities. Every job has responsibilities. Specific achievements are far more impressive and memorable to the reader. Sometimes using numbers is also effective.

For example, “I was jointly responsible for saving the organisation more than $5000 during the budget”.

Just remember, your resume is your chance to sell yourself whether the design, the format or the content – it must be slick, easy to read and full of great buzz words.

How to write a cover letter

Posted on July 9, 2014 by

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By Ross Larkin

Writing a cover letter can be one of the most difficult aspects of job searching – even more than the dreaded job interview.

Sure, you might possess the most impressive, skill-laden resume in the world, yet it won’t mean a thing if your cover letter isn’t right.

Why? You need to communicate and summarise your relevant skill set, previous experience, reasons for your interest and why you are the right person all within the confines of a single page, using the perfect tone and just the right amount of personality.

It’s easy to see why so many get it wrong.

The first golden rule is never recycle a cover letter. Each one must be tailored according to the specifics of the particular company and role you’re applying for. Blanket letters are obvious to any trained eye, so you will only waste your own time.

The second is to address a real person and never “whom it may concern”. The preference being, of course, to use the correct person’s name, which you should be able to ascertain with a quick telephone call.

Refer to the job title within the first paragraph. There’s no need to keep your reader guessing and you have very little time to get to the point.

Now jump straight in and make your enthusiasm and appropriateness for this opportunity clear by matching your specific skills and experience with the particulars of the job.

“For the past three years I have worked in a similar role primarily as an administrator”,

or

“My training in this area has given me the relevant skills required.”

A little research on the company and the position will go a long way in addressing each area with the most relevance.

Remember – you’ve only got one page. Nobody has time to kick back and read your biography, no matter how intriguing it may be.

Finally, wrap up your letter with a summary about why you are right for the job and encourage the reader to peruse your resume, making it clear you would love the opportunity to meet and discuss your application further.

How to write a resignation letter

Posted on June 27, 2014 by

By Ross Larkin

Writing a resignation letter

It’s no secret that younger people change jobs more frequently than ever, so most of Gen Y and beyond are developing seriously killer interview skills and a resume to rival any that came before it. Yet, it seems when writing a resignation letter, many are somewhat in the dark. 

The resignation letter requires thought, planning and strategy. It’s definitely not something to leave until the last minute.

Before you begin, ask yourself the following questions.
  1. Am I certain about the length of notice I’m obliged to serve?
  2. Will that notice period line-up with my future start date or world trip departure?

Now, try not to stress out about your boss’s potential reaction to the news. Even if you know your boss tends toward the dramatics, remain confident and firm about your decision, and whatever you do – don’t let him or her talk you out of your decision. Staying in a role you threatened to leave will forever leave an awful taste in both yours, and your boss’s mouths.

Decide whether to keep the letter strictly formal and brief, or take the opportunity to express some thanks and even sadness at the closing chapter.

Even if you didn’t see eye-to-eye with your boss or completely loathed your job, put all negative feelings behind you and remain professional with a positive tone so you leave on good terms.

If keeping it brief, just state the facts. You’re submitting your resignation letter effective as of the date chosen with an indication of your notice period. It’s also worth mentioning how long you worked for the company.

Generally speaking, a touch of personality and warmth in your letter doesn’t go astray. You might like to wish your employer all the best for the future and offer to assist with a handover. Keeping strong relations is worth much more to you than burned bridges and departing animosity.

Writing a resignation letter might seem the least of your priorities, but it is essential, and a good one with the right tone and timing can mean the difference between a mediocre reference and a sensational one.

Adzuna Australia is hiring!

Posted on March 11, 2014 by

adzuna_target_logo_pantone

​Join Australia’s most exciting recruitment start-up and change the way Australians find their next job!

Adzuna.com.au is a young, hungry start-up on an exciting growth journey to disrupt the online recruitment sector (backed by Fairfax in Australia). Launched in the UK in 2011 we are now live in 11 countries around the world! We are already growing the business by over 100% each month and our ambitions are to become the premier destination for Australian job-seekers.  Adzuna.com.au is a search engine for job ads which makes it easier for you to find the right job. We search thousands of websites so you don’t have to and bring together millions of ads so you can find them all in one place. We add powerful search, insightful market data and social connections, so you can find your perfect ad with a little help from your friends.

Marketing Executive
We’re looking for a Marketing Executive to join us.  This position is responsible for implementing SEO and content tactics, managing social media communications, and, acting as first point of contact for customer service enquiries. You will implement the agreed SEO and Social tactics in order to:

• Improve SEO page rankings
• Drive traffic to the website
• Engage the Adzuna audience across social networks
• Effectively manage inbound customer service enquiries
• Act as brand ambassador
• Maintain and develop a very positive impression of Adzuna in the public mind
• Always keep the customer front and centre – be customer focused.

National Sales Executive
We’re looking for a National Sales Executive to join us.  This role is responsible for winning new business and building profitable relationships in the large and mid-tier recruitment agencies by selling cost-per-click (CPC) services to support Adzuna’s rapid growth.

Reporting to the CEO, the role involves researching the recruitment agency market, generating a list of leads, reaching out and acquiring new business across Australia.

To be successful you’ll have 2+ years of proven sales and account development experience in online cost-per-click advertising or the recruitment agency arena and a good understanding of the online jobs/classifieds market and recruitment agencies.  You’ll have experience in selling & handling client accounts over the phone as well as face-to-face sales, excellent communication and presentation skills and be well organised, detail-oriented, ambitious, energetic and smart.

Partner Engineer and Client Onboarding
We’re looking for a Partner Engineer to work with our partners to integrate their content into our search engine. In this role, you will engage with some of the most influential advertisers, their developers and work closely with Adzuna’s world-class engineering and product team. The ideal candidate will combine excellent technical and business skills with programming experience to make our partners in Australia successful and improve the Adzuna platform. The engineer is also expected to translate technical requirements back to ‘english’ for the client & the sales team.

To be successful in this role you you need:

• BA/BS in Computer science or related field
• Previous experience: preferred (1 + years) actual experience as a developer or software engineer
• Software development skills in one or more of the following languages: HTML, Perl, Python or PHP
• Experience using regular expressions
• Familiarity with Debian/Ubuntu (or other Linux distribution) and Linux command-line
• Ideally you will have experience with SQL and MySQL (or another DMBS) and git (or another VCS or DVCS)
• Solid communication skills

If you’d like to be part of a fun, dynamic and effective start-up then we’d love to hear from you.  Get in touch at careers@adzuna.com.au

Check out our new Adzuna video